Productions

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I have directed new writing, devised work and classics. I am Artistic Director of Spatfeather and co-ran Liquid Theatre from 2002-2012.

Here is a taste of some of my shows:

Powder Monkey 2011





by Amanda Dalton
Manchester Royal Exchange
2010, revived 2011

A new play for young people exploring the world of child soldiers
**** What's On Stage  **** The Public Reviews

The Liberation of Colette Simple



'Overall The Royal Exchange Theatre should be commended for producing such high quality theatre for a younger audience, something many other theatres attempt to do but fall heavily short of the mark, this is theatre of the highest pedigree, not only does it entertain but it evokes real emotion and leaves you asking many questions as you leave the theatre.'

The Public Reviews

How to Disappear...















By Spatfeather
Based on The Case of the Crushed Petunias by Tennessee Williams
Jacksons Lane
2014

A new music theatre cabaret show with lyrics by seven writers


★★★★
“A HILARIOUS & GRIPPING PIECE”

The Upcoming

“A PLUCKY EXPERIMENT IN THEATRICAL FORM, WITTY EDGE AND ENERGY”

The Guardian

“CHARMING AND DISARMING QUIRKINESS”

TimeOut




“EXCELLENT AND TENACIOUS PERFORMANCES”

Everything Theatre

“A QUIRKY GEM”

The Stage






















How to Disappear Completely and Never be Found
By Fin Kennedy
LAMDA
2013

The Rosenstreet Protest






















By Conor Mitchell
LAMDA
2010

A new music theatre piece about Berlin women who saved their Jewish husbands from the Nazis 

Nina



















By Adam Meggido
LAMDA
2009

A new play about Anton Chekhov and the first two productions of The Seagull









The Musician












By Conor Mitchell
Belfast International Festival and Tour
2009

A new opera for young people

'The pacing of the production is close to perfect. Following a slow and subdued opening, the original music and songs are a joy to listen to and gradually propel the narrative along.'














Endgame by Samuel Beckett
BAC
2002

































Cowboy Mouth by Sam Shepard
BAC
2002

There is a moment towards the end of Cowboy Mouth when a giant crustacean is sitting comfortably on a bed listening to a man and a woman play rock music; it makes you wonder just what the characters in this play are taking. Then you wonder what Sam Shepard and Patti Smith were taking when they penned this little number back in 1971, when rock'n'roll really was the new rock'n'roll. Cowboy Mouth is weird, wild and rather wonderful, albeit in minor key.

Cavale and Slim are holed up in one room. She has kidnapped him at gunpoint and taken him away from his wife and family with dreams of turning him into a rock'n'roll star, the new saviour. They have fallen in love, but love is wearing rather thin now that boredom has set in and Slim is less than keen to play the game. And my, can Cavale play games, often featuring her dead, stuffed black crow and her gun. Her life is a tapestry of stories in which reality and fantasy are tightly knit and life and death, the mythic and the mundane, go cheek by jowl.

This Shepard fragment speaks eloquently of the pain of a generation for whom Jagger and Dylan turned out not to be rock'n'roll Jesuses after all. It looks forward thematically and stylistically to his future plays, particularly Tooth of Crime and Fool for Love. It also offers its own excitements in the lovers' duels between Cavale and Slim, which are stamped with their own precise musicality, sometimes wild and cacophonous and sometimes sweet and lyrical.

Matt Peover's astute production has the benefit of an atmospheric and useful design by Christian Zollenkopf that picks up on all the drama's motifs, as well as two fine, energetic performances from Natalie Turner-Jones as Cavale, a woman intent on reinventing herself, and Ben Duhl as the man who can't quite buy into the rock'n'roll dream.

It is a brave choice of play for Peover, who might have shown off his obvious talents more flashily with a classic text. But then, as Shepherd's play suggests, the world would be a pretty grim place without risk, dreams and especially imagination.

Lyn Gardner, The Guardian 2002